Healthy Homes - Habitation saine

 
 
Every person deserves affordable, livable housing. In many low income neighbourhoods, tenants live with mold, pests, broken elevators, and other challenges because landlords will not do the repairs needed. ACORN Canada members fight for landlord licensing, building inspections, and stronger enforcement of maintenance rules and by-laws.
 

Livable Housing Forum


March 1st, 2010 - Toronto ACORN is leading the city wide campaign to fix rental housing.

 

Last year the city launched a new inspection regime as a result of a multi-year campaign by Toronto ACORN, tenant groups and our allies on city council.  While this program has seen some results – it’s also further exposed the extent of the problem.

Toronto tenants continue to be forced to endure bed bugs, mold, poor maintenance and other abuses, largely at the hands of a handful of large corporate landlords.

As a next step in Toronto ACORN’s campaign to see the city expand and improve the existing program we are holding a City Wide Forum to rally tenants and announce new supporters of the campaign.

WHAT: Livable Housing Forum
WHEN: Saturday, March 20th, Noon

WHERE:  Main Square Community Centre (245 Main St. just south of Danforth ave.)

 

Sun: Inspectors to probe city's 5,000 rental buildings

City building inspectors are boldly going where they’ve never gone before in the battle against slum landlords.

“We’re actually going to get our own staff to go out there effectively with a checklist and do every single (rental) building in the city and kind of rate them,” Jim Hart, the executive director of Municipal Licensing and Standards, said.

“It’s a big job but we’re going to do it. We’ve barely started it but it’s going to get going in the next couple of months.”

Hart said no one has attempted to catalogue the rental stock in the city before because the job was seen as too big.

Undaunted, he’s determined to send out about 100 inspectors to give nearly 5,000 buildings a once-over, so his 12-member audit team can better focus its efforts on the buildings most in need of improvements.

Sun: Wounded man won't tell police

The building is no stranger to trouble.

In June 2008, a 31-year-old man was shot in the buttocks during an argument on the ninth floor of the building.

And in 1992, the 14th floor was the scene of a knifing homicide that left postal worker Richard William Stevens, 43, dead.

"Tenants don't feel safe. There's no security," said Tatiana Jaunzems, field director for Toronto ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now).

"Many people are stuck there simply because they have no place to go."

Full Articles: http://www.torontosun.com/news/torontoandgta/2010/01/09/12401466-sun.html

Welcome Minister Bradley

Ontario has new Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.  To welcome him to his new job we've setup a tool that will let folks send him quick message to welcome his new job but also remind him about a couple important things;

1) That Ontario ACORN is calling on the provincial government to include inclusive housing enabling legislation in the upcoming long term affordable housing strategy.

2) That Jim Bradley, the new Minister should sit down with Leaders from Ontario ACORN to discuss inclusive housing and other housing issues.

Inclusive housing (commonly known as Inclusive Zoning) is a practice that is used in various forms in over 200 municipalities across North America and has the potential to radically change the way we build affordable housing in Ontario. The granting of these powers would give Ontario municipalities a powerful new tool to build and maintain affordable housing.

Click to Take Action on this Campaign >>

Inclusive Housing in Ontario

ACORN Canada and other organizations across Ontario are working together with the aim of enacting municipal inclusive housing bylaws.

Inclusionary housing policies establish municipal housing programs that rely upon the development regulations and approval process to provide affordable housing in market housing projects.

The policies represent a fundamentally different way to provide affordable housing from the conventional social housing programs used to date in this country.  Over 200 American jurisdictions have adopted Inclusive Housing Policies.

All inclusionary programs in the US contain more or less the same main regulatory components, but typically vary in their regulatory detail. The following describes what might be called the basic or predominant model.

It merits noting that the programs establish fixed and non-negotiable regulations that apply universally to all eligible projects. There is only one notable exception to this: some programs – namely, the big city programs – allow for negotiating the cost offsets while continuing fixing all of the other aspects.

*some of this story are taken from a Wellesley Institute Backgrounder on Inclusive Housing.

Tenants Vote 2010

In the last 5 years we’ve petitioned, we’ve picketed, and we’ve organized.

But the next 16 months leading up the municipal election are going to decide whether Toronto City Council is interested in improving standards for tenants or simply letting the status quo remain.

Today, Toronto ACORN is announcing a plan to escalate this campaign.

In the coming months every City Councilor will have a chance to vote on an ACORN-backed proposal to levy a fee on large landlords to fund pro-active apartment inspections.

Toronto ACORN is pledging to use this vote as a yardstick to identify a number of key ridings to run aggressive campaigns to increase the tenant voter turnout by 25% in support of councilors or candidates who support tenants.

But we need our supporters online to send a message to council and let them know we’re serious. Can you help? (Just click the link below)

www.tenantsvote2010.ca

Tenants Vote 2010

In the last 5 years we’ve petitioned, we’ve picketed, and we’ve organized.

But the next 16 months leading up the municipal election are going to decide whether Toronto City Council is interested in improving standards for tenants or simply letting the status quo remain.

In the coming months every City Councilor will have a chance to vote on an ACORN-backed proposal to levy a fee on large landlords to fund pro-active apartment inspections.

But we need our supporters online to send a message to council and let them know we’re serious. Can you help? (Just click the link below)

Click to Send a Message to Mayor Miller and Council >>

Ontario Budget Response

Yesterday the Government of Ontario released their budget for the coming fiscal year.

The budget contains a number of tax changes, spending programs and direct payments to Ontarians, but ACORN would like to highlight investment in one particular area; Affordable Housing.

In the lead up to the federal budget ACORN, along with our allies, ran an energetic campaign urging the federal government to use their stimulus spending to build and repair Canada’s affordable housing stock.

While the federal government opted to provide rebates to consumers who re-pave their driveway or build a new deck at their cottage, it appears Queen’s Park got the message.

The budget is calling for the renovation of 50,000 existing social housing units and the construction of 45,000 new affordable housing units.

Two further points around this issue are also encouraging; first, the money provided has a two year life span, helping create a sense of urgency around affordable housing that had been lacking in recent years.  As well, Finance Minister Duncan told the CBC that in some cases municipalities may not be required to provide matching funds to access the money.

Budget for Housing: Build the Economy

The Federal Government is announcing a budget and stimulus package on January 27th.

The time to act is now.

ACORN is calling for the budget / stimulus package to include $1.8 Billion for two housing initiatives. First, a national affordable housing strategy to build new affordable housing, and secondly a national fund to provide resources to Provinces and Municipalities to repair their existing social housing stock (as called for in the CCPA AFB, 2009).

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Click Here to Send an Email to Harper, Flaherty and Ignatieff

This will accomplish three key goals: Creating new living wage jobs to stimulate the economy, improving the quality of the existing social housing infrastructure and building much needed new affordable housing.

Currently, as many as 1.5 million Canadians are experiencing core housing need, meaning that they are under-housed or face an unsustainable financial burden to maintain their current housing situation (CMHC).

ACORN Featured in the Toronto Sun

ACORN Member Shows Toronto Sun Slum-Like Conditions in his Apartment

BEN SPENCER, SUN MEDIA  July 4th, 2008

If it wasn't so serious, it would almost be funny.

Michael Fitz Gerald peered up at the gaping hole in the ceiling above a neighbour's shower and shook his head.

From this third-floor Scarborough hellhole, he had a clear view of the piping leading to his bathtub on the fourth floor.

That's what six weeks of leaking pipes will do to 40-year-old drywall. While he may be at wit's end over his landlord's inaction, Fitz Gerald hasn't lost his sense of humour. "I just hope my tub doesn't fall through into her shower some day," he said.

 

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