Healthy Homes - Habitation saine

 
 
Every person deserves affordable, livable housing. In many low income neighbourhoods, tenants live with mold, pests, broken elevators, and other challenges because landlords will not do the repairs needed. ACORN Canada members fight for landlord licensing, building inspections, and stronger enforcement of maintenance rules and by-laws.
 
See our Healthy Homes demands here.
 

Le Droit: Manif pour plus de logements abordables

April 23rd, 2010 by François Pierre Dufault - Le Droit

Une association qui défend les locataires de logements abordables à Ottawa déplore le fait qu'encore trop de ménages sont dans l'attente d'un chez-eux.

Hier, des membres de l'Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) ont manifesté devant un complexe de logements abordables à l'angle du chemin Richmond et de l'avenue Croydon, dans l'ouest de la ville.

Ils ont voulu signaler aux gouvernements l'urgence de bâtir de nouveaux logements à prix modique et de rénover ceux qui sont déjà construits.

« Il n'y a pas assez de logements abordables et la situation ne s'améliore pas. Elle s'aggrave. On donne des logements abordables en priorité aux sans-abri qui devraient plutôt se trouver dans des maisons d'accompagnement et il ne reste plus assez de logements pour ceux qui vivent au salaire minimum », a dénoncé Diane Rochon, une membre d'ACORN à Ottawa.

ACORN propose également la création de fonds en fiducie où les locataires de logements abordables pourraient déposer leur montant de leur loyer, sans craindre d'être expulsés, dans le but de forcer les propriétaires à rénover leur logis.

À l'heure actuelle, plus de 10 000 familles sont dans l'attente d'un logement abordable à Ottawa.

Original article at: http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-droit/actualites/ottawa-est-ontarien/201004...

 

Le Droit: Le logement abordable au coeur de la campagne électorale

June 16th, 2010 by François Pierre Dufault - Le Driot

Le regroupement des organismes communautaires pour la justice sociale à Ottawa enjoint les candidats aux élections municipales du 25 octobre prochain à s'engager à créer davantage de logements abordables.

C'est le message que l'Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) entend marteler tout au long de la campagne électorale. Le groupe demande la construction d'au moins 1000 nouvelles unités de logement abordable par année, seulement pour répondre à la demande.

« Les listes d'attente pour du logement abordable ne cessent de s'allonger », de constater Éloi Proulx, un membre fondateur de l'ACORN.

Selon les plus récents chiffres de l'Alliance pour mettre un terme à l'itinérance (AMTI), quelque 10 000 familles vivent dans l'attente d'un logement subventionné par la Ville d'Ottawa.

Jusqu'à présent, seul le conseiller municipal et candidat à la mairie, Alex Cullen, s'est formellement engagé à créer plus de logements abordables.

« Je veux y consacrer la moitié des 23 millions $ que le gouvernement de l'Ontario versera à la Ville d'Ottawa pour ses programmes sociaux. Ça ne va pas régler le problème, mais ça va donner un sérieux coup de pouce », a déclaré M. Cullen au Droit.

 

Inside Toronto: Downtown rally calls for affordable housing

July 13th, 2010 by Justin Skinner - Inside Toronto

Concerned over the lack of a national housing strategy, a group of local activists gathered in Toronto's financial core on Thursday, July 8.

A small group of housing advocates from the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, Canada (ACORN Canada) took their pleas to the streets, urging the Harper government to support Bill C-304, tabled by Vancouver East MP Libby Davies.

The bill calls for more funding for safe, affordable housing to help combat homelessness across the country.

Edward Lantz, chair of ACORN's St. James Town chapter, said they opted to lobby at the corner of King and Bay streets because it would be the best place to reach Conservative supporters.

"We don't have a Conservative MP in Toronto, but the majority of the support for the Conservative government comes from down here," he said.

Lantz noted both the Liberals and New Democrats have supported the idea of a national housing strategy. The Conservatives' refusal to support such a strategy, however, has left Canada as the only G8 country without one.

He said the recent G20 Summit showed where the Harper government's priorities lie.

"The current Harper government spent $1.5 billion on the G20," he said. "That could provide 16,000 new (affordable housing) units in the City of Toronto."

With waiting lists for affordable housing at an all-time high - the wait is currently at least 10 years - too many Canadians are forced to spend 30 per cent or more of their monthly income on rent, he said, adding that does not even take into account the hundreds of thousands of Canadians who are homeless, or those living in overcrowded spaces or substandard housing.

"We want landlords to be held accountable and we need rent controls," Lantz said. "The average rent in Toronto for a one-bedroom apartment is $800 to $900, and when you get most people making $13 or $14 and hour, prices have escalated too much."

Fellow ACORN member Carmen Respondek said the need for housing was critical. She echoed Lantz's sentiments that the money spent on G20 security should have gone toward housing instead.

"I was shocked when I heard about the fake lake," she said. "Who needs a fake lake when we don't have affordable housing?"

$100 million in repairs for tenants

$100,000,000.00 in repairs by landlords and inspectors sent to all 5,000+ of the city's high-rise buildings.

That's what 6 years of tenant organizing by Toronto ACORN and countless hours of dedicated members have earned.

The City brought in an enhanced apartment inspection program developed after pressure from Toronto ACORN and tenant groups late last year and now estimate it has resulted in $100 millions in repairs by landlords.  Further, Municipal Licensing and Standards is now sending inspectors to all 5,000+ highrises across Toronto to perform basic audits to find and target the worst buildings for increased inspections.

The program falls short of the comprehensive system of landlord licensing that Toronto ACORN has long campaigned.  Toronto ACORN members have fought for a system with hard financial penalties on negligent  landlords who refuse to maintain their buildings up the legal code.  Toronto ACORN members have held community actions, rallied at city hall, given deputations, and held city wide housing forums to build public support and awareness of the Toronto’s deteriorating housing stock and the need for reform.

ACORN members remain proud of this tremendous progress that has been made and remain committed to working with the City to expand and improve the enhanced inspection program.

Tenants, allies join forces for tenant protection fee

On March 20th, Toronto ACORN held a forum with community leaders from across the city to renew our commitment to winning a proactive system of apartment inspection in the city.  ACORN members described to the 100+ person audience the long history of our housing campaigns in Toronto and the progress we’ve made up to this point.

At the municipal level, 7 City Councillors attended the event and all signed on to support the levying of a tenant protection fee on large landlords to fund a proactive inspection regime.  Further, they committed to support a motion coming before Council on March 31st that aims to ensure tenant input into any new apartment inspection system.

Unlike previous housing forums held by ACORN, this event included representatives from the Provincial government in support of enhancing provincial support for tenants.

Toronto ACORN is pursuing a meeting with the Minister of Housing, Jim Bradley to discuss our recommendation for provincial enhancements of the laws regulating apartment standards and new tools the municipalities could use to ensure fair housing for tenants.

Livable Housing Forum


March 1st, 2010 - Toronto ACORN is leading the city wide campaign to fix rental housing.

 

Last year the city launched a new inspection regime as a result of a multi-year campaign by Toronto ACORN, tenant groups and our allies on city council.  While this program has seen some results – it’s also further exposed the extent of the problem.

Toronto tenants continue to be forced to endure bed bugs, mold, poor maintenance and other abuses, largely at the hands of a handful of large corporate landlords.

As a next step in Toronto ACORN’s campaign to see the city expand and improve the existing program we are holding a City Wide Forum to rally tenants and announce new supporters of the campaign.

WHAT: Livable Housing Forum
WHEN: Saturday, March 20th, Noon

WHERE:  Main Square Community Centre (245 Main St. just south of Danforth ave.)

 

Sun: Inspectors to probe city's 5,000 rental buildings

City building inspectors are boldly going where they’ve never gone before in the battle against slum landlords.

“We’re actually going to get our own staff to go out there effectively with a checklist and do every single (rental) building in the city and kind of rate them,” Jim Hart, the executive director of Municipal Licensing and Standards, said.

“It’s a big job but we’re going to do it. We’ve barely started it but it’s going to get going in the next couple of months.”

Hart said no one has attempted to catalogue the rental stock in the city before because the job was seen as too big.

Undaunted, he’s determined to send out about 100 inspectors to give nearly 5,000 buildings a once-over, so his 12-member audit team can better focus its efforts on the buildings most in need of improvements.

Sun: Wounded man won't tell police

The building is no stranger to trouble.

In June 2008, a 31-year-old man was shot in the buttocks during an argument on the ninth floor of the building.

And in 1992, the 14th floor was the scene of a knifing homicide that left postal worker Richard William Stevens, 43, dead.

"Tenants don't feel safe. There's no security," said Tatiana Jaunzems, field director for Toronto ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now).

"Many people are stuck there simply because they have no place to go."

Full Articles: http://www.torontosun.com/news/torontoandgta/2010/01/09/12401466-sun.html

Welcome Minister Bradley

Ontario has new Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.  To welcome him to his new job we've setup a tool that will let folks send him quick message to welcome his new job but also remind him about a couple important things;

1) That Ontario ACORN is calling on the provincial government to include inclusive housing enabling legislation in the upcoming long term affordable housing strategy.

2) That Jim Bradley, the new Minister should sit down with Leaders from Ontario ACORN to discuss inclusive housing and other housing issues.

Inclusive housing (commonly known as Inclusive Zoning) is a practice that is used in various forms in over 200 municipalities across North America and has the potential to radically change the way we build affordable housing in Ontario. The granting of these powers would give Ontario municipalities a powerful new tool to build and maintain affordable housing.

Click to Take Action on this Campaign >>

Inclusive Housing in Ontario

ACORN Canada and other organizations across Ontario are working together with the aim of enacting municipal inclusive housing bylaws.

Inclusionary housing policies establish municipal housing programs that rely upon the development regulations and approval process to provide affordable housing in market housing projects.

The policies represent a fundamentally different way to provide affordable housing from the conventional social housing programs used to date in this country.  Over 200 American jurisdictions have adopted Inclusive Housing Policies.

All inclusionary programs in the US contain more or less the same main regulatory components, but typically vary in their regulatory detail. The following describes what might be called the basic or predominant model.

It merits noting that the programs establish fixed and non-negotiable regulations that apply universally to all eligible projects. There is only one notable exception to this: some programs – namely, the big city programs – allow for negotiating the cost offsets while continuing fixing all of the other aspects.

*some of this story are taken from a Wellesley Institute Backgrounder on Inclusive Housing.

Pages