Healthy Homes - Habitation saine

 
 
Every person deserves affordable, livable housing. In many low income neighbourhoods, tenants live with mold, pests, broken elevators, and other challenges because landlords will not do the repairs needed. ACORN Canada members fight for landlord licensing, building inspections, and stronger enforcement of maintenance rules and by-laws.
 
See our Healthy Homes demands here.
 

Toronto ACORN win on polling stations

July 25th - Members of Toronto ACORN met with the director of elections for the City of Toronto last week over concerns about the accessibility of polling places in low income neighbourhoods in Toronto.

At the meeting he committed to dramatically increasing the number of high rise building that would have their own polling stations.  The City now hopes to have polling stations in 647 of the high rise buildings with more than 100 units, and that no polling place should be more than 800 feet from a high rise.

This meeting followed an action at City Hall in early July where tenants voiced their concern the City wasn’t doing enough to ensure that high rise tenants would have the same level of access to polling places that are found in many condo towers.

Statement on National Day of Action for Affordable Housing

July 8th, ACORN Canada members are coming together today for a National Day of Action to call on the Harper Conservatives to support private members Bill C-304 for a national housing strategy.

Currently the Bill has support from both the Liberals and the NDP.

ACORN Canada members will be holding rallies, press events, and petitioning in Metro Vancouver, Hamilton, Toronto and Ottawa.

Miloon Kothari, the United Nations special rapporteur on adequate housing, came to Canada in 2007 and recommended that Canada adopt a comprehensive and coordinated national housing policy based on indivisibility of human rights and the protection of the most vulnerable.

In June 9 2009 the federal government accepted the UN recommendations on housing, and stated:

"Canada acknowledges that there are challenges and the Government of Canada commits to continuing to explore ways to enhance efforts to address poverty and housing issues, in collaboration with provinces and territories."

It's time to make good on these commitments.

Bill C-304 would require the federal government to consult with the Provinces and Territories to develop a National Housing Plan that would "ensure secure, adequate, accessible and affordable housing for Canadians".

It's time for a national housing strategy

When Parliament recessed earlier this month Bill C-304 for a National Affordable Housing Strategy had made impressive progress, having passed second reading, but still wasn't law.  The Bill would require the government to consult with the provinces and establish a national housing program. 

ACORN Canada members across the country are excited by this progress but frustrated by the delays and Parliamentary gridlock preventing it from becoming law.  Since the Federal Government's decision in 1996 to remove CHMC from the process of building affordable housing, Canadians have been without a meaningful national housing plan. 

On July 8th, ACORN members and supporters are planning action in a number of cities across Canada to build support for this important piece of legislation.

For details on the Toronto action click here

For details on the Ottawa action click here

For details on the Metro Vancouver action click here

For details on the Hamilton action click here

 

Progress on Affordable Housing

Bill 58, amendment to the planning act passed second reading at Queen's Park yesterday.  If passed the bill would give Ontario's municipalities the power to enact 'inclusionary zoning' policies.  Inclusionary zoning works by granting developers increased density in new residential developments in exchange for including a percentage of affordable housing units.

The bill was brought forward by NDP MPP Cheri Dinovo, and won support from a number of Liberal MPP's as well.  ACORN Canada as been calling the Ontario Government to make inclusionary zoning legislation a key plank in the planned Long Term Affordable Housing Strategy.

Many thanks go out to all of you who sent a message to Municipal Affairs Minister Jim Bradley - his Deputy Minister for Housing MPP Donna Cansfield was one of the Liberal MPP's who voted in support of the bill.  There will be more to come as this campaign progresses.

Don't Bloc Affordable Housing

Image waking up one morning this spring and reading this headline:

"Bill to create National Housing Strategy defeated in House of Commons"

I don't want to feel like I could have done more and didn't. Do you? ACORN members have been organizing to build community support for Bill C-304 for a National Housing Strategy, but we need to keep the pressure up until the final vote.

Can you take action to help win the passage of this important piece of legislation?

Click to Take Action on this Campaign >>

Le Droit: Manif pour plus de logements abordables

April 23rd, 2010 by François Pierre Dufault - Le Droit

Une association qui défend les locataires de logements abordables à Ottawa déplore le fait qu'encore trop de ménages sont dans l'attente d'un chez-eux.

Hier, des membres de l'Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) ont manifesté devant un complexe de logements abordables à l'angle du chemin Richmond et de l'avenue Croydon, dans l'ouest de la ville.

Ils ont voulu signaler aux gouvernements l'urgence de bâtir de nouveaux logements à prix modique et de rénover ceux qui sont déjà construits.

« Il n'y a pas assez de logements abordables et la situation ne s'améliore pas. Elle s'aggrave. On donne des logements abordables en priorité aux sans-abri qui devraient plutôt se trouver dans des maisons d'accompagnement et il ne reste plus assez de logements pour ceux qui vivent au salaire minimum », a dénoncé Diane Rochon, une membre d'ACORN à Ottawa.

ACORN propose également la création de fonds en fiducie où les locataires de logements abordables pourraient déposer leur montant de leur loyer, sans craindre d'être expulsés, dans le but de forcer les propriétaires à rénover leur logis.

À l'heure actuelle, plus de 10 000 familles sont dans l'attente d'un logement abordable à Ottawa.

Original article at: http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-droit/actualites/ottawa-est-ontarien/201004...

 

Le Droit: Le logement abordable au coeur de la campagne électorale

June 16th, 2010 by François Pierre Dufault - Le Driot

Le regroupement des organismes communautaires pour la justice sociale à Ottawa enjoint les candidats aux élections municipales du 25 octobre prochain à s'engager à créer davantage de logements abordables.

C'est le message que l'Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) entend marteler tout au long de la campagne électorale. Le groupe demande la construction d'au moins 1000 nouvelles unités de logement abordable par année, seulement pour répondre à la demande.

« Les listes d'attente pour du logement abordable ne cessent de s'allonger », de constater Éloi Proulx, un membre fondateur de l'ACORN.

Selon les plus récents chiffres de l'Alliance pour mettre un terme à l'itinérance (AMTI), quelque 10 000 familles vivent dans l'attente d'un logement subventionné par la Ville d'Ottawa.

Jusqu'à présent, seul le conseiller municipal et candidat à la mairie, Alex Cullen, s'est formellement engagé à créer plus de logements abordables.

« Je veux y consacrer la moitié des 23 millions $ que le gouvernement de l'Ontario versera à la Ville d'Ottawa pour ses programmes sociaux. Ça ne va pas régler le problème, mais ça va donner un sérieux coup de pouce », a déclaré M. Cullen au Droit.

 

Ottawa Metro: Affordable housing plan needed: ACORN

July 9th, 2010 by Steve Collins - Ottawa Metro

About two dozen people gathered outside cabinet minister John Baird’s constituency office to call for a national affordable housing strategy.

Members of the local chapter of the Association for Community Reforms Now (ACORN) came out in support of Bill C-304, a private members’ bill introduced by NDP MP Libby Davies.

“We’re one of the richest countries in the world, and every other (G-8) country has a national housing strategy. Shame on Canada for not having a national housing strategy,” ACORN board member Kathleen Fortin said. “There’s 10,000 people here in Ottawa on the waiting list for housing.”

After the rally, the group attempted to meet with Baird. Office staff refused to open the door, so demonstrators taped a sign to the office door and slipped an information sheet under it.

Ottawa EMC: Residents rally for housing strategy

July 15th, 2010 by Katie Stewart - OttawaEMC

EMC News- Ottawa residents rallied with ACORN last week to bring awareness and gain support of Bill C-304, which calls for a national housing strategy.

If passed, the bill would require the federal government to bring all levels of government together to enact a plan to increase safe and affordable housing across Canada.

"We need to build affordable housing in Canada. We're the only G8 country without a national housing strategy," said Ottawa ACORN member Sheila Searles, who is also an active tenant leader in her building on Russell Rd. that is owned by Ottawa Community Housing Corporation.

Even though Canada is one of the richest countries in the world, in Ottawa alone, there are over 10,000 people on a waiting list for affordable housing. People can wait close to eight years for a unit to become available and in Ontario, the wait lists have increased by 9.6% in the last year.

"Housing is fundamental. Without stable housing, your education and job are jeopardized, It's essential," said Shannon Lee Mannion, community leader for affordable housing in Centretown. "Affordable housing helps stabilize people. It's a life raft."

Currently, the bill has gained the support from the Liberal, NDP, and Bloc Quebecois parties. When the bill passed its second reading in Parliament in September 2009, all MP's from these parties voted in support of Bill C-304. However, the Conservative government has yet to come on board and support the bill. Only one MP from the party voted in favour of the bill. There are 137 Conservative members of Parliament.

"They don't care because they don't have to care," said Ms. Mannion.

The demonstration of about 30 people on July 8 took place on Carling Avenue in front of the office of Conservative MP John Baird in an attempt to gain support of the bill. Mr. Baird voted against Bill C-304.

"We want John Baird and the Conservative government to give at least some consideration to this bill. This is important. It's a national crisis," said Ms. Mannion.

Andrea Thomas who is a tenant leader on her block in the east end said that the Conservatives who voted against the bill should try living in affordable housing to see how it feels for people who depend it.

"We need more housing and we need to gain the support from the Conservative government," said Ms. Thomas.

When the ACORN group approached Mr. Baird's office to present him with an information sheet, they were refused entry and were eventually ignored.

Mr. Baird's office would not provide a comment to The EMC.

"It you pay tax dollars, you deserve to talk to your MP. It's appalling," said Kat Fortin, supporter of Bill C-304.

Tahir Nazari, who voted for Mr. Baird in the last election, said he would not be voting for him again.

"We should get a response. I am living in Ottawa housing and we are facing problems. No one is helping," he said.

Presently, Ontarians are still waiting for a provincial strategy for affordable housing.

kstewart@theemc.ca

Globe and Mail: Councillors move to get renters to the polls

July 16th, 2010 by Kelly Grant - Globe and Mail

For council speaker Sandra Bussin, the scale of tenant disenfranchisement in Toronto hit home at Hanson House, a seniors complex near Coxwell Avenue and Hanson Street.

The entire building was accidentally dropped from the rolls a few elections back, she said.

The situation wasn’t much better at the Alexandra Park public-housing complex in Councillor Adam Vaughan’s downtown ward in 2006.

“When the polls opened three hours late on election day,” he said, “there were four names on the list.”

Toronto City Council and local election officials are determined not to leave renters out of the 2010 election. But they face an uphill battle adding tenants to a voters list riddled with errors and omissions.

“Right now, the likelihood that a tenant is on the list is virtually zero,” said Ms. Bussin, councillor for Ward 32 Beaches-East York.

Council voted last week to direct the city manager’s office to launch an aggressive outreach campaign in apartments and condos.

Achieving that proved difficult – the city clerk’s office, which oversees municipal elections, presented an outside legal opinion that concluded council couldn’t tell the clerk what to do on an election matter.

After hours of passionate debate, council found a loophole and asked the city manager’s office to build on the efforts of the clerk’s office, which is already working with tenant groups and the Toronto Community Housing Corporation to pump voter turnout beyond a dismal 38.9 per cent in 2003 and 39.3 per cent in 2006.

“What the clerk’s department said was for us to advocate on behalf of tenants is for politicians to interfere with the electoral process and that that would put the entire election in jeopardy,” Mr. Vaughan said. “If someone wants to overturn the results of the election because we made an extra effort to enumerate tenants, we think there’s not a judge in the country that would buy that.”

Renters have tumbled through gaps in the system since 1999, when Queen’s Park farmed enumeration out to the newly created Municipal Property Assessment Corporation and killed the old-fashioned, door-to-door voter registration drive.

Mistakes plague MPAC’s preliminary voters lists across the province, but the problem is especially acute in Toronto, where half of all residents rent and many don’t speak enough English to fill out the paperwork properly.

Whereas owners are added to the voters’ list when they buy a home or business, renters have to rely on the owner of their building to send their names to MPAC.

Assuming that list is correct, MPAC mails an occupancy form to the tenant. Owners receive the same form when they buy. Fifty per cent of homeowners return the form; only 20 per cent of tenants do, said Janet Andrews, Toronto’s manger of elections and registry services.

Like all eligible voters, tenants can still cast a ballot by presenting valid identification and proof of address at a polling place – assuming they can find the correct station.

That’s why ACORN, the controversial activist group, is pushing for Toronto to put polling stations in every building with more than 100 units. “It’s more convenient for people to go into their lobbies,” said Edward Lantz, an ACORN board member and chair of the St. Jamestown chapter, one of seven in Toronto. “We don’t want anybody to get left behind.”

Ms. Andrews called that idea cost-prohibitive in a city with 5,000 residential buildings five storeys or taller. Extra polling stations cost about $8,500 a pop: $8,000 for a new vote-tabulating machine and a minimum of $500 for staff.

Using census data and poll-by-poll counts, Ryerson University professor Myer Siemiatycki found that the percentage of tenants had no impact on voter turnout in 2003 and a slightly positive effect on turnout in 2006. In other words, places with a high concentration of renters actually boasted a voter turnout slightly higher than the average in the last election.

“Until very recently, one of the stock assumptions in the municipal arena was tenants vote at a much lower rate than homeowners,” he said. “The data over the last couple of elections shows that’s a myth. Tenants do vote and they need to be enumerated.”

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